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2012 Election Voter Guide: Final Installment

news@dailylobo.com

For the last installment of the 2012 Election Voter Guide, the Daily Lobo covered the write-in candidates for the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives for District 1, followed by the state House of Representatives candidates for districts 19, 23, 27, 30 and 31.

Robert Anderson
Write-in candidate for U.S. Senate, no party affiliation

Anderson does not have a public Facebook page.
AndersonForSenate.org

324 Richmond Drive, S.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87106
(505) 401-4707

The Albuquerque Journal did not do a candidate profile on Anderson.

The New Mexico League of Women Voters asked Anderson what he would do to improve the national economy and create jobs, and he said, “Abandon trickle-down economics and implement a progressive tax structure, tax the rich, not workers, close corporate tax shelters and loopholes, roll back the outrageous military budget and put that savings toward investment in our state’s education, health environmental needs and a solar-based green New Deal. Higher education should be free and home mortgage foreclosures canceled to keep families in their homes. Support worker ownership programs and decolonize New Mexico’s economy.”

According to a KRQE article titled “Husband, wife running for Congress” published Aug. 27, Anderson said he supports decreasing funding for New Mexico’s national labs: “This whole high-tech mecca of high salaries for some people that will trickle down to the rest of the state is a failed strategy. That money needs to go toward building a better education system and making an investment in the future of the young people in this state.”

In regard to health care, Anderson told KOB in an article entitled “Write-in candidate for U.S. Senate – Bob Anderson” that he supports a single-payer health care system, in which the government pays for and provides health insurance, rather than private companies.

In the article, he said “I would like to see a Medicare system that covers all Americans regardless of age…The people of New Mexico need health care like the members of Congress have for themselves.”

On Aug. 21, the Albuquerque Journal published an opinion article by Anderson, in which he talks about crony capitalism, criticizes trickle-down economics and the way the government operates. “Our mayor, the Chamber of Commerce and many on the City Council are leaders of this latest trickle-down scheme,” he wrote. “This scam is hidden behind the smokescreen called public-private partnerships, to fool the unwise into thinking that government is being run with fewer regulations and more efficiency. But what we are seeing is just a new way for the big fish in the private sector to eat their little fish competitors and fleece the public at the same time.” wrote.

Jeanne Pahls
Write-in candidate for U.S. House of Representatives, District 1 (Green Party)

Pahls does not have a public Facebook page.
PahlsForCongress.com

324 Richmond Drive S.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87106
(505) 401-4808

The Albuquerque Journal did not do a candidate profile on Pahls.

On her website, under “Thoughts,” Pahls lists what she thinks the government needs to do to improve the economy and create jobs.

Some of these points are eliminating tax cuts for the wealthy, cutting the defense budget, and adequately funding education.

In regards to the Affordable Care Act, Pahls said on her “Thoughts” page that, “It is a good first step, initiating a discussion about the right to adequate health care and probably saving many lives at the same time. It unfortunately requires more people to turn to the insurance companies, and this system currently sucks more than $400 billion of our health care dollars per year. We need a government nonprofit, which will guarantee health care for all and keep costs down. This is single-payer health care.”

Her website has a “What’s Needed for Education” page, which includes goals for education and post-secondary education. Among her goals for the latter, she supports reliance on full-time professors “rather than exploiting part-time adjuncts,” increasing support for Pell Grants, free or affordable education and fair pay for post-secondary educators.

In her “On the National Deficit Page,” Pahls criticizes her opponents, Michelle Lujan Grisham and Janice Arnold-Jones, for supporting spending cuts without mentioning “raising taxes on corporations or reducing funding for current war and weapons production. This is because both the Democratic and Republican parties are beholden to corporate interests, including the military-industrial complex.” On the page, Pahls said she supports cutting funding for wars and covert operations, which “only increase foreign anger against the U.S.,” and raising corporate tax rates.

Incumbent Rep. Sheryl Williams-Stapleton (D-19)

Democratic candidate for state House of Representatives, District 19

Facebook.com/SherylWilliamsStapleton
SherylWilliamsStapleton.org
P.O. Box 25385, Albuquerque, NM, 87125
(505) 265-6089

Williams-Stapleton is currently serving on the following legislative committees:
• Legislative Council
• Legislative Education Study
• Courts, Corrections and Justice
• Investments and Pensions Oversight
• New Mexico Finance Authority Oversight
• Education
• Labor and Human Resources
• Printing and Supplies
• Rules and Order of Business

Williams-Stapleton began serving in the Legislature in 1995.

NMLegis.gov lists only the bills she sponsored or co-sponsored since 1996, which includes 143 bills, 40 of which passed.

This year, she sponsored a bill that called for the “creation of a comprehensive strategic education plan to eliminate the achievement gap and increase the graduation rates of Hispanic, Native American and African American students,” according to the final wording. The bill, which passed, cited the fact that 70 percent of public school enrollment consists of Hispanic, Native American or African American students who are underachieving academically, according to the final wording.

She also sponsored an act calling for additional professional development for public school teachers this year. According to the final wording, each year schools are to create a professional development plan based on the results of a “highly objective” assessment of teacher performance. The bill passed.

In 2007, Williams-Stapleton sponsored the “Minority Business Assistance Act,” which passed. The act created “a program to mentor and assist small, minority-owned businesses in developing the business practices, technical competence and expertise in business ethics, accounting principles and government procurement that will allow them to compete in a modern business environment,” according to the final wording.

In her Albuquerque Journal candidate profile, when asked if she supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act, she said she supports the act, and that “The federal government pays almost all the costs, providing a major boost to New Mexico’s economy and jobs. The first three years, the federal government will pay all cost for expanding Medicaid.”

The Journal also asked if she supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, and she said, “Our tax code is outdated and needs revision. We need a full analysis, a more strategic view of future needs that includes multiple revenue sources, not only personal income tax.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Williams-Stapleton’s highest contributor is Plumbers and Steamfitters Local 412, which accounts for $5,500, or 12.55 percent, of her total contributions. Her second highest contributor is the Albuquerque Teachers Federation at 8.67 percent, followed by the New Mexico Trial Lawyers Association at 6.84 percent, The New Mexico Federation of Labor AFL-CIO at 5.7 percent and the American Federation for State, County and Municipal Employees at 5.25 percent.

Erica Landry

Republican candidate for state House of Representatives, District 19

Facebook.com/EricaLandryForNmStateRepDistrict19
ElectEricaLandry.com

P.O. Box 4304, Albuquerque, NM, 87198
(505) 256-9145

Landry does not have previous experience in the Legislature.

According to her website, she received the Governor’s Award for Outstanding New Mexico Women in 2004.

Her priorities, listed under “Why Vote for Erica Landry” on her website, are a plan to improve the economy, education and quality of life. Her economic goals include promoting the International District “to simulate Nob Hill business success,” and developing a community-based economic engine and infrastructure. In regard to education, she said she wants to end social promotion and “target tax dollars to the classroom where it belongs.” Improving quality of life entails restoring District 19 to its “historical prominence,” and ensuring the community’s safety “by ending urban blight,” according to her website.

According to her candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, Landry founded the Southeast Community Economic Alliance, a “business incubator.”

When the Journal asked whether she supports increased spending with regard to the Affordable Care Act, Landry said, “New Mexico already provides for the most neediest. However, legislators need to analyze the actual costs and benefits of the Medicaid expansion to make informed decisions. If elected, this is what I plan to do.”

The Journal asked whether she supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, which Landry said she opposes.“Taxpayers already have a heavy state tax burden, and educational institutions conversely are bleeding money,” she said.

“We need to clean up the rampant budget waste and lack of fiduciary accountability within various government agencies.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Landry is her own top contributor, accounting for $3,500, or 27.42 percent, of her total contributions. Her second highest contributor is the American Federation of Republican Women PAC at 7.83 percent, followed by Robert Keen of Albuquerque at 7.83 percent, CSI Aviation Service at 3.92 percent and Ty Juana Hise of Placitas at 3.92 percent.

Hessel Yntema III

Independent candidate for state representative, District 19

Yntema does not have a public Facebook page or a campaign website.

732 Valverde Drive S.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87108
(505) 266-5474

Yntema does not have previous experience in the Legislature.
According to his candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, Yntema was the Albuquerque City Councilor for District 6 from 1987 to 1991 and 1999 to 2003.

In his candidate profile, Yntema told the Journal he supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act.

When the Journal asked whether Yntema supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, he said he probably opposes. “My vote on behalf of District 19 would depend on the overall budget circumstances,” he said.

FollowTheMoney.org does not have campaign finance information about Yntema. His campaign finance reports on the Secretary of State’s website show he has contributed all $350 of his total campaign funds.

Marci Blaze

Democratic candidate for state House of Representatives, District 23

Blaze does not have a public Facebook page.
MarciBlaze.com

47 West Valverde Road, Corrales, NM, 87048
(505) 216-9645

Blaze does not have previous experience in the Legislature.

Among her “socially progressive and fiscally conservative” beliefs listed on her website are incentives for accountable and sustainable business, ensuring the rights of women, protecting the environment, responsible and balanced taxation, investment in job training and the Affordable Care Act. She elaborates on each of these points on her “Issues” page.

Her site also has “The Facts,” in which she states that her “biggest concern in New Mexico is with small business, because they are struggling to compete with big out-of-state corporations that have been given significant tax advantages. Those big companies need to pay their share, to level the playing field.”

She lists organizational and individual endorsements on her site, which include AFL-CIO New Mexico Federation of Labor, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the American Federation of Teachers, the American Teachers Federation and the New Mexico branch of the National Education Association.

In her candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, when asked if she supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act, Blaze said, “New Mexico has the nation’s second highest uninsured rate. By expanding Medicaid, we provide care for our most vulnerable and get an 85 percent federal match. Preventive care for 170,000 saves money in health care costs.”

When the Journal asked whether she supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, she said, “In New Mexico, a person making $28 million pays the same income tax as one making $28,000. The reduction for the rich has cost our state $1.5 billion in lost revenues. We should restore progressivity.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Blaze’s top three campaign contributors each account for $5,000, or 4.62 percent of her total contributions. They are the New Mexico Trial Lawyers Association, herself, and the New Mexico Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee. Her fourth highest contributor is Tsan Abrahamson of Berkely, Calif. at 2.77 percent, followed by the American Federation for State, County and Municipal Employees at 2.77 percent.

Paul Pacheco

Republican candidate for state House of Representatives, District 23

Facebook.com/pages/People-for-Paul-Pacheco/109708589055955
PeopleforPaulPacheco.com

4216 Rancho Grande Place N.W., Albuquerque, NM, 87120
(505) 263-9235

Pacheco does not have previous experience in the Legislature.

The issues he lists on his website are jobs and taxes, driver’s licenses and undocumented immigrants, crime and public safety, concealed carry of firearms, education, corruption and ethics, government spending and the death penalty.

Under “Jobs and Taxes,” Pacheco states, “Small businesses are the engine that drives our state economy. I believe that excessive taxes kill small business. As your state representative, I will work hard to reduce the tax burden that has been placed on them, encouraging small business owners to hire more employees and grow their businesses.”

The individual and organizational endorsements he lists on his website include the Albuquerque Journal, the National Federation of Independent Business, the Association of Commerce and Industry and the New Mexico Fraternal Order of Police. According to his website, Pacheco was an Albuquerque Police Department officer for 27 years.

In his candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, Pacheco said he opposes increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act: “I support access to affordable health care for all New Mexicans — through market-based solutions, including competition across state lines, tort reform, and common sense-based risk pools.”

When the Journal asked if he supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, he said he opposes it and that “The problem New Mexico government faces is not insufficient revenue, it’s that we spend too much. No one I meet door-to-door tells me they are not taxed enough. We must prioritize our spending.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Pacheco’s top campaign contributor is the Susana PAC, which accounts for $5,000, or 9.22 percent, of his total contributions. His second highest contributors are state House of Representatives candidate Thomas Taylor at 8.48 percent, followed by Mark Murphy of Roswell at 4.24 percent, Friends of Yvette Herrell at 2.31 percent and state House of Representatives candidate Nate Gentry at 2.31 percent.

Christine Trujillo
Democratic candidate for state House of Representatives, District 25

Facebook.com/electchristinetrujillo
ElectChristineTrujillo.com

1923 Madeira Drive N.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87110
(505) 266-6638

Trujillo does not have previous experience in the Legislature.

Her website’s “On The Issues” page states that she’s been elected to the New Mexico Public Education Commission, has served as state president of the American Federation of Teachers NM, and state president of the New Mexico Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO.

On the same page, she states she is “committed to supporting the community and increasing access to health care. Communities like ours recognize that businesses need certain infrastructure and services in order to operate. They need roadways, an educated workforce, police and fire protection and a court system to enforce their contracts. Big Corporations should pay their fair share.”

Her website lists her individual and organizational endorsements, which include the New Mexico Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, and the New Mexico branch of the American Federation of Teachers.

On her candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, she said she supports increased spending in accordance with the Affordable Care Act, and that “Expenses to the state don’t start for three years, 90 percent will be paid by the federal government for new recipients after that. It is unconscionable to do less.”

In the profile, she said she supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools: “In New Mexico, a person making $28 million pays the same personal income tax as one making $28,000. Those figures speak for themselves.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Trujillo’s top contributor is Plumbers and Steamfitters Local 412, which accounts for $4,000, or 13.28 percent, of her total contributions. Her second highest contributor is the New Mexico Trial Lawyers Association at 8.3 percent, followed by the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees at 7.64 percent, Painters and Allied Trades at 6.64 percent and David Poms of Malibu, Calif. at 6.64 percent.

Elisabeth Keen
Republican candidate for state House of Representatives, District 25

Keen does not have a public Facebook page.
ElectKeen.com
Note: The website was down at the time this article was written.

3400 Palomas Drive N.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87110
(505) 883-4813

Keen has no previous experience in the Legislature.

VoteSmart.org lists her issue positions on education, business and government.

For education, Keen said, “New Mexico’s education system is broken. Elisabeth Keen will go to Santa Fe and work for commonsense solutions to improve our education system because she understands she works for you, not powerful special interests.”

For business, she said, “New Mexico needs to be “open for business” if we are going to create good job opportunities for all. Let’s do away with unnecessary regulations and lower the tax burden to create a friendly environment in which small businesses can operate.”

For government, she said, “We can create a better government in New Mexico. To achieve this, we must ensure the Legislature is addressing the needs of the entire citizenry. In other words, government should work for us — not the other way around.”

In her candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, when asked whether she supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act, she said, “We need to make sure we are caring for our most vulnerable citizens without incurring unsustainable future debt for the state.”

When the Journal asked whether she supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, she said she opposes “increasing personal income tax rate on any income bracket because history indicates tax reductions lead to increased revenue.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Keen’s top contributor is Robert Keen of Albuquerque, accounting for $4,300, or 29.08 percent, of her total contributions. Her second highest contributor is Janet and David Steele of Albuquerque at 7.44 percent, Charles Hancock of Albuquerque at 6.76 percent, Margaret Cudney of Potomac MD at 4.73 percent and the New Mexico Gas Co. at 4.06 percent.

Ronald Krise
Democratic candidate for state House of Representatives, District 27

Krise does not have a public Facebook page.
RonaldKrise.com

9809 Greenbrier Road N.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87111
(505) 828-9188

Krise has no previous experience in the Legislature.

Under “Issues” on his website, Krise lists education, job creation, legal reform, elections and environment as important.

To build the economy, in addition to creating jobs, Krise states on his website that he will “Ensure New Mexico is a leader in renewable energy by embracing innovation and technology, encouraging government/private sector partnerships by providing incentives, investment opportunities and training, and offering incentives to companies who bring high paying jobs.”

Krise is endorsed by the Albuquerque Teachers Federation, the Albuquerque Educational Assistants Association and the Albuquerque Secretarial Clerical Association, according to his website.

To strengthen schools, he states on his website that he will support teacher compensation reform and smaller classrooms, address language barriers and inadequate teaching materials, encourage deep conceptual understanding in teaching and promote early intervention in reading deficiency.

In his candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, when asked whether he supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act, Krise said, “Do the math. We invest $500 million, receive $6 billion, first three years cost New Mexico nothing, then feds pay 90 percent, estimated ‘50,000’ new jobs.
Hospitals across New Mexico have urged the governor to accept the expansion.”

When the Journal asked if he would support a tax increase for general government spending and public schools, he said he opposes raising state personal income tax rates.

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Krise has three contributors. He is his own top contributor, accounting for $1,380, or 57.98 percent, following by Lee Kann of Albuquerque at 31.51 percent and the Jicarilla Apache Nation at 10.5 percent.

Incumbent Rep. Lorenzo “Larry” Larrañaga (R-27)
Republican candidate for state House of Representatives, District 27

Larrañaga does not have a public Facebook page or campaign website.

7716 Lamplighter Lane N.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87109
(505) 821-4948

Larrañaga is currently serving on the following legislative committees:
• Legislative Finance
• Investments and Pensions Oversight
• Public School Capital Outlay Oversight Task Force
• Water and Natural Resources
• Investigatory Subcommittee of the Rules and Order of Business
• Rules and Order of Business
• Appropriations and Finance
• Agriculture and Water Resources

Larrañaga has served in the Legislature since 1995. NMLegis.gov lists only the legislation he sponsored or co-sponsored since 1996, which includes 156 bills, 26 of which passed.

In 2007, Larrañaga sponsored a bill to amend the Oil and Gas Reclamation Fund, which was created in 2006. The fund was to be distributed by the Oil Conservation Division of the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department. Its purpose was to fund surveillance of abandoned wells and well sites and to prepare plans to plug abandoned wells and restore abandoned sites and associated production facilities. Its secondary purpose was to support energy education in the state, not to exceed $150,000 each year. The amendment was to ensure the available funds were stable by “increasing the maximum amount to be held in the Oil and Gas Reclamation Fund before triggering a decrease in the Oil and Gas Conservation Tax,” according to the final wording. The amendment passed.

In his candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, in regard to the Affordable Care Act and whether he supports increased spending for it, Larrañaga said he “would support the additional expenditure to insure more people and change laws or administrative rules to have all adults make a co-pay contribution on a sliding scale to the cost of Medicaid.”

The Journal asked whether he supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, and he said he is opposed to increasing the state personal tax rate for any New Mexico resident.

The UNM Alumni Association’s Lobos for Legislation recognized Larrañaga as its 2009 Higher Education Distinguished Legislator.

According to the Association’s website, it recognized his work in the Legislature “to restore critical budget funding to UNM.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Larrañaga’s top two contributors each account for $2,300, or 5.94 percent, of his total contributions, Nick Sanchez of Albuquerque and Goodrich Roofing.

His third highest contributor is the New Mexico Realtors Association at 5.16 percent, the New Mexico Dental Association at 2.58 percent and the Committee to Elect Don Bratton at 2.58 percent.

Mary Ellen Broderick
Democratic candidate for state House of Representatives, District 30

Facebook.com/ElectMaryEllenHD30
ElectMaryEllenBroderick.com

8522 Flower Place N.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87112
(505) 463-9159

Broderick has no previous experience in the Legislature.

The issues she lists on her website are rebuilding the economy, education, environment, health care and human rights.

In regard to the economy, she states she has been personally affected by the recession and is therefore in a unique position to implement change in terms of job creation, according to her website. She refers specifically to the film and sustainable energy industries as those that should be tapped into to bring high paying jobs into the state, saying, “Focusing on the advanced technologies surrounding clean energy will enable our state to create thousands of homegrown, good-paying jobs that cannot be exported.”

Among the endorsements she lists on her website are Democrats for America, the American Federation of Teachers, the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees and the Women’s Campaign Fund.

In her candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, Broderick said she supports the Affordable Care Act. “People are sick and need care. If New Mexico accepts the Medicaid expansion, the federal government provides $6 billion over the same period, resulting in health care and jobs. We are compassionate people.”

In the profile, she said she supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools: “In New Mexico, a person making $28 million pays the same income tax rate as one making $28,000. The income tax reduction for the rich has cost our state $400 million each year in lost revenues.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Broderick has four contributors tied for top contributor, each accounting for $5,000, or 9.09 percent, of her total contributions. These are the Ken Martinez Leadership Fund, Forward New Mexico, New Mexico Defense Fund and the New Mexico Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee. Her fifth highest contributor is Democracy for America at 7.28 percent.

Incumbent Rep. Nate Gentry (R-30)
Republican candidate for state House of Representatives, District 30

Facebook.com/NateGentryNM
NateGentry.com

3716 Andrew Drive N.E., Albuquerque, NM, 87110
(505) 508-0782

Gentry is currently serving on the following legislative committees:
• Courts, Corrections and Justice
• Economic and Rural Development
• Mortgage Finance Authority Act Oversight
• Judiciary
• Voters and Elections
• Enrolling and Engrossing – A

Since he began serving in the Legislature in 2011, Gentry sponsored or co-sponsored 28 bills, two of which passed.

The issues he lists on his website are jobs, ethical leadership, education and taxes and spending. Under jobs, he states he “will continue his efforts to make New Mexico a business-friendly state that attracts high quality jobs. He’ll also keep up the fight to protect small businesses — the backbone of our economy.” Where education is concerned, he states he will work to make sure more money goes to classrooms rather than government bureaucrats. He also states he wants to lower taxes, and that “we can’t tax our way out of a recession.”

In his candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, when asked whether he supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act, Gentry said, “I support expanding coverage to protect our most vulnerable populations. However, we need additional assurances from the federal government that it will pay for 90 percent of any expansion after the year 2020.”

He also said he opposes raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools. “In this economy, we need to be frugal with taxpayer money and cut unnecessary spending.

Improving our economy and encouraging investment in New Mexico will require keeping taxes low for small businesses and families,” according to his candidate profile.

On his Facebook page, Gentry said in September that he received endorsements from the Association of Commerce and Industry and the National Federation of Independent Businesses.

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Gentry’s top contributor is the Susana PAC, accounting for $5,000, or 3.56 percent, of his total contributions. His second highest contributor is Stanley Harper of Mansfield, Texas at 3.27 percent, followed by Adam Trubow of Albuquerque at 1.88 percent, Ben Spencer of Albuquerque at 1.81 percent and Kevin Reid of Albuquerque at 1.81 percent.

JoAnne Allen
Democratic candidate for state House of Representatives, District 31

Facebook.com/pages/JoAnne-Allen/346992418685293
DrJoAnneAllen.com

11024 Montgomery Suite 227, Albuquerque, NM, 87122
(505) 797-4144

Allen has not previously served in the Legislature.
The issues she lists as important on her website are health care, education, jobs and economy and small business, and women. Under education, she said taking education seriously entails “investing in public colleges and universities, supporting advanced technical training, strengthening grant programs and providing aid for student loan application and pay off so that loans for education do not strap our brightest students with huge debt that will follow them into their search for hard-earned careers.”

To build the economy, she said, “Any strong jobs plan must include a short-term program that will immediately accelerate growth; investment in infrastructure, transportation, schools and universities. Long-term priorities include job training and re-training, tax credits for clean energy and alternative/renewable energy research and development, and rewards for companies that hire returning vets and the unemployed worker and professional.”

Allen said small businesses are a vital part of boosting the economy, as they can provide higher-paying in-state jobs, rather than poverty-wage jobs from out-of-state. “Our small business owners need simple, straightforward regulations to work through—and we need to give them our best attempt at partnering with their drive and determination.”

In her candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, when asked whether she supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act, she said, “The economic boon to New Mexico of accepting the Medicaid expansion would be foolish and unconscionable to reject. Add the benefit of improving the health of workers and children while adding good paying, health-related jobs.”

The Journal asked whether she supports raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, and she said, “Taxes are at their lowest rate in 80 years. To increase taxes can help fully fund education and public services such as police; ensure our infrastructure is sound, well-maintained and viable for the future.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Allen is her own top contributor, accounting for $7,502, or 15.52 percent, of her total contributions. Her second highest contributor is Charles Goodis of Albuquerque at 6.21 percent, James Brainard of Albuquerque at 2.48 percent, Jane Miller of Albuquerque at 2.28 percent and Norman Johnson at 2.07 percent.

Incumbent Rep. William “Bill” Rehm (R-31)
Republican candidate for state House of Representatives, District 31

Facebook.com/BillRehmNM
BillRehmNM.com

P.O. Box 14768, Albuquerque, NM, 87191
(505) 259-3398

Rehm is currently serving on the following legislative committees:
• Courts, Corrections and Justice
• Economic and Rural Development
• Investments and Pensions Oversight
• Judiciary
• Voters and Elections

Since he began serving in the Legislature in 2006, Rehm sponsored or co-sponsored 136 bills, 17 of which passed.

This year, he sponsored a bill “requesting the Governor to appoint an unemployment compensation task force to consider options for changes to the current program, including community service requirements, shared work plans and individual savings accounts, among others.” The final wording cites that the recent economic downturn has made it difficult to maintain unemployment insurance funds, making it so many states have had to request “burdensome” loans from the federal government. Because of the expected slow recovery from “the great recession,” the bill calls for “New Mexico policymakers to find ways to improve the unemployment compensation program in a way that benefits both employers and employees.” The bill passed.

In 2009, he sponsored a bill “requesting the Human Services Department to collaborate with the New Mexico Association of Counties and the University of New Mexico Hospital to study the funding of indigent care at the hospital.” The final wording states that “the total cost of uncompensated care at the hospital rose from more than one $137 million in fiscal year 2006 to more than one $161 million in fiscal year 2008.” The bill, which passed, called for the study to explore alternative ways of funding indigent care.

The year prior, he sponsored a bill calling for a study of options for securing federal funding to support uncompensated indigent care in all New Mexico hospitals. The bill passed.

In his candidate profile on the Albuquerque Journal website, when asked whether he supports increased spending in regard to the Affordable Care Act, Rehm said, “I support the concept of insurance for everyone. While the current increase in the program will cost $500 million, there is not an agreement with the federal government what those costs will become after 2020.”

In the profile, he said he opposes raising taxes to support general government spending and public schools, saying, “Everyone must pay some amount of income tax. Our current tax table forces higher-income taxpayers to pay more income tax.”

According to FollowTheMoney.org, Rehm’s top contributor is Farmers Insurance Group, accounting for $1,500, or 3.96 percent, of his total contributions. His second highest contributor is Chama River Brewing Company at 2.72 percent, followed by Chevron Corp. at 2.64 percent, Don Mcleod Trust at 2.64 percent and Gallagher and Kennedy at 2.45 percent.