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Monday, December 22, 2014

UNM Crime Briefs

Tires reported punctured near Hokona

On March 6, a UNM student reported to UNMPD that three of his car tires had been punctured and flattened while the vehicle was parked near Hokona Hall. According to the report, the student returned the next day to report the fourth tire had been punctured and flattened. There were no witnesses and no further information at the time of the report.

Cops: battery stolen from car in G Lot

On March 13, a man returned to his car parked in G Lot and attempted to start it. When it failed to do so, he opened the hood and discovered the battery was gone. According to the UNMPD report, there was no suspect information or witnesses at the time of the report. The case is considered to be closed, pending further leads.

Tagger likes spirits of school, Jesus

On March 14, two UNMPD officers were dispatched to a wall that comes out south of Masley Hall. There, they reportedly discovered that an unknown suspect had spray-painted phrases such as “lobo’s #1,” and “Jesus Loves You,” in addition to various symbols. By the time police arrived, personnel from the UNM Physical Plant Department were already painting over the area. The case is considered to be closed pending further leads.

Student reports Internet flimflam

A UNM student reported an incident of fraud to UNMPD on Friday.

According to the report, she had accepted a job offer for a “helper/nanny” position through her UNM email account on March 8. Two days later, she was reportedly contacted by “Pakshun Bevar” by email, notifying her that she would receive the $500 for her first week’s pay. On March 13, she received a check for $3,600 and the following day she received an email instructing her to take $1,000 of that money for her pay and use the remaining $2,600 to buy toys and materials for the job, according to the report.

She was also reportedly instructed to use MoneyGram to transfer the $2,600 out of her account to “Arifi Alex” in Venice, Fla. She did so that day, and later her bank informed her that the check was fraudulent and had been deducted from her account. She suffered a loss of $2,600 of her own money that was transferred through MoneyGram. The identity of the individual posing as the employer was unknown at the time of the report, and no further information was available.