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Friday, May 22, 2015

Galleries



Taking it to the plaza

By Kanan Mammadli

A large, open, flat concrete surface? Limited foot traffic? Sign them up. Some UNM alumni take advantage of an empty Zimmerman Plaza every Sunday to square off in street hockey. Lacing up their skates and competing hard, they say it offers a reprieve from their everyday work life. 


A dying breed

By Nick Fojud

Webs, plates, rollers, joggers and folds are terms that are being added to the endangered diction list, as print journalism is slowly becoming extinct.

Stateofthemedia.org states that from the year 2003 to 2012 print advertising revenues have fallen by roughly $26 million, and online revenues are on a steady incline. With this shift from print media to digital media, daily papers across the country are shutting their doors and turning off their presses.

Vanguard Printing uses a letterpress-style printing press that is completely hands-on and has no computer oversight. During this process, pressmen Brent Sells and John Coates are constantly on the move, checking for focus, alignment and color balances.

Vanguard’s printing press is more complex than sending off documents through a computer, and Sells and Coates are a testament to the art behind it. In the ever-changing media landscape, species of professionals like Sells and Coates might not be around for too much longer.


Home sweet home

By Diana Cervantes

Tent City inhabitants have relocated time and time again throughout their battle with the city of Albuquerque for the right to to call someplace home. With each eviction notice, residents learned to adapt and create new homes wherever they went. This photo essay focuses specifically on the residents’ previous location near Interstate 40 and Lomas Boulevard. The small desert plateau offered little shelter from the immense heat, but the tent city residents offered no complaints. These snapshots represent a day in the life of Tent City. The future of Albuquerque’s Tent Cities has yet to be determined.


High hopes

By Hannah Glasgow

Freshman pitcher Matthew Smallwood has been playing baseball since the age of 5. He has Major League aspirations, but said “there’s a lot of other goals besides winning” that he’d like to accomplish as a Lobo, such as volunteering.

“I feel like we can make a big difference in the community just because we’re a part of the UNM baseball team,” Smallwood said. “But besides that, of course, winning a couple Mountain West conferences and a College World Series would be a dream come true.”

Smallwood is one of only nine New Mexicans on this year’s roster

“My mom always told me that hard work beats talent if talent doesn’t work hard, and I really believed in that growing up,” he said.

Smallwood will be in Virginia to play for the Winchester Royals in the Valley Baseball League, a collegiate summer league.


No life without movement

By Di-Linh Hoang

Dalila Baied didn’t start dancing when she was 12 years old. She said she took hip hop and jazz classes, and only began taking dancing seriously when she was 17. “I want to be a dancer,” she said. “I don’t care if I’m not a ballerina or I didn’t start at four years old.”

A December 2014 graduate in psychology and dance, Baied has danced professionally since she graduated at the Santa Fe Opera, and she recently traveled to Austria to work with a dance company.

Baied recently became a certified yoga instructor as well. She began doing yoga as a workout while already in dancing.

“Yoga classes came pretty easy to me since I was already flexible and it was an asset to my dance training,” she said. Baied said she wants to get a master’s degree in psychology later in life, and she plans to continue dancing in the meantime.

“I know I love to dance,” she said. “Movement is something I can’t live without.”


A true Fighting Lion

By Denise Gallegos

Isaac Velasquez, a four-sport athlete at Santa Rosa High School, was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma during his senior year. Although he struggled with his illness and treatments, Velasquez continued to suit up and support his team. He has since been cured of the cancer and is now participating in baseball and track and field. Isaac will graduate high school in mid-May.


Breaking norm

By Derrick Toledo

New Mexico is among the highest-rated states when it comes to ethnic and cultural diversity. With that great diversity comes large numbers of cultures seeking knowledge and education. UNM’s American Indian Student Services has no shortage of Native American students seeking opportunities. The alternative spring break started with the initiative of giving back to communities.

This year featured the second annual AISS Alternative Spring Break. The group traveled to the Havasupai reservation in Arizona. The Havasupai are an indigenous tribe native to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, which is only accessible by helicopter or an eight-mile hike down the canyon walls. A group of UNM students spent their spring break on a trip to the Native land as an alternative means to traditional partying. They spent their time working on environmental improvement as well as learning about the Havasupai tribe.


ASUNM Election Results Announcement

ASUNM Election Result Announcement


New Mexico Sand Volleyball vs. Grand Canyon Home Opener

New Mexico sand volleyball hosts Grand Canyon University for its inaugural season home opener at StoneFace Courts in Albuquerque on March 21. The Lobos lost to the Antelopes 4-1.


New Mexico Men's Basketball vs. Wyoming (Senior Day)

New Mexico 52, Wyoming 49 OT


New Mexico Women's Basketball vs. Fresno State (Senior Day)

New Mexico 63, Fresno State 60


Tent City

Albuquerque's Tent City

http://www.dailylobo.com/article/2015/01/1-30-tent-city


New Mexico Swimming & Diving vs. Colorado State

New Mexico Swimming & Diving vs. Colorado State (Senior Day)


Cairo Tentmakers

Tentmakers from Cairo presenting their work during Quilt Week put on by the American Quilter's Society running Jan. 14-17.


2015 Albuquerque Comic-Con


New Mexico Basketball vs. Colorado State

New Mexico 66, Colorado State 53


Going beyond the stigma

Burlesque Noir has been “berlesking bad” since its founding by Holly Rebelle in 2005. Rebelle discovered early on as a solo performer that performing burlesque allowed her to fully express herself artistically and was so exhilarating; it gave her “glitter hangovers” for days after being on stage. Knowing that art history extensively celebrates the female form, she wanted to be a part of this artistic body expression movement. The desire to share this experience with a group of women gave rise to the creation of her very own burlesque troupe.

“[Burlesque] has been a deep exploration of identity for me,” Rebelle said. “One of the things I am most proud of is creating an open space for women to creatively express themselves using their bodies.”

Rebelle said she enjoys the journey of creation that goes into burlesque and knows there truly is artistry in its performance.

“I have seen burlesque open up discussions that are often only discussed within the academic sphere such as cultural appropriation, feminism, racism, ageism, critique on capitalism, the problems of the patriarchy, violence, privilege, body shaming, slut shaming and power dynamics. I am so thankful to be part of a community where this dialogue is ongoing and is possible,” Rebelle said.

Nudity during any burlesque show is the controversial part of the art form. Rebelle said she is familiar with the stigma and believes the continued shaming and hiding of the naked body, especially of women’s bodies, is what keeps some people from accepting burlesque as a true performance art.

“I think it is OK and normal, that once in a while, people are offended by art,” she said. “Art inspires us to talk about the difficult issues in society and can open a door to explore the world with different eyes and new perspectives.”

~ Photos by Sergio Jiménez


Global gaze

International students are seen all around campus on a daily basis. UNM leads all universities in the state for having the most international students in attendance, according to the Global Education Office. New Mexico ranks 40th nationally in international student enrollment. “We have about 1,222 students at the University, but we are working to increase this number,” said Pablo Torres, senior operations manager at the Global Education Office. Chinese students are the most common international students at UNM. There are 223 students from China, 188 from India, 118 from Brazil, 76 from Iran and 67 from South Korea.

~ Photos by Kanan Mammadli


A kick out of life

Christopher Wehan remembers the first time he knew soccer came natural to him. At a soccer practice when he was 6 or 7 years old, his coach asked to see how far he could kick the ball, and his went the farthest.

Now a junior majoring in organizational communication, Wehan said the sport taught him about life.

"(Soccer) gave me an education,” he said. “I think a lot of the things I learned in life, I learned through soccer like how to deal with hardship, injures. It has given me the best friends I will ever have, and the best opportunity to travel the world."

Wehan's best game was when he scored two points against Old Dominion this season.

"This season was pretty good, personally,” he said. “It was a really good season for myself. I scored a lot of goals and got to play a lot, but as a team we didn't reach our goals and expectations, so at the end of the day it’s kind of a bummer, kind of a sad end to things. But overall it still was a great season.”

Next season, Wehan said his goals are "to be a better teammate and a better leader, rather than any goals on the field."

After graduating, Wehan plans to continue playing professional soccer, calling it “a dream of mine."

~ Photo by Di Linh Hoang


A thousand little faces

Albuquerque currently has thousands of homeless children under the age of 6, and CLNkids aims to end the cycle of homelessness through education.

Parents receive job skills training while the children receive the highest quality of early childhood education at no cost. CLNkids is a place many children call home, and is often a sanctuary away from the chaos of homeless shelters, hotels and living in cars.

The workers and volunteers at CLNkids believe in the impact of education and care deeply for the children in their care. Sherri Wells, development and communication director at CLNkids, said she is passionate about the organization because she can “use my talent for storytelling for a purpose and a cause. I love our children more than life. I have seen how just one caring person can make an impact on someone else’s life.”

The children’s ages range from six months to 8 years old or older, and undergo a typical day of schooling which includes breakfast, playtime, naptime and age relevant education. CLNkids currently depends on the support from private and public donations, advocacy and volunteerism.

~ Photos by Diana Cervantes