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Mt. Olive Baptist Church
Culture

Mt. Olive Baptist Church has served Albuquerque’s Black community since before New Mexico’s statehood 

When Tabytha Watson moved to New Mexico from Texas in 1898, the state did not have a Baptist church. To fill that need, Watson began organizing prayer days and Sunday school classes in her Albuquerque home located on Fourth St. and Copper Ave., according to Historic Fairview Cemetery. However, her ministry didn’t end there. One year later, Watson sought expansion and led the formation of the Mount Olive Baptist Church. Together with her church members, Watson raised enough funds to purchase a $135 lot on Lead Ave. Soon after, services moved from Watson’s home to the new building in Downtown Albuquerque, according to Historic Fairview Cemetery. Today, Mt. Olive is recognized as the first Black Baptist Church to open its doors in New Mexico.


Representation in Comic Books/ Superhero realms
Culture

Black superheroes and representation in comics

The Marvel versus DC debate is as old as time, but when it comes to Black representation, scholars suggest independent publishers, writers and artists are the best source. “Marvel and DC both pale in comparison to the independent, alternative and creator-owned comics scenes,” Jesús Costantino said – an associate professor of English at the University of New Mexico. For a comic to have good Black representation, it needs to feature a Black character in a storyline written by Black writers that speaks to Black readers. This is not yet the norm in the industry, Costantino said.


Blackdom NM.jpeg
Culture

UNM researcher studies Black settlement in NM

Blackdom was one of New Mexico’s first Black settlements, located about 15 miles south of Roswell. It was the most important Black homestead in the state, according to the U.S. National Park Service. One of the leaders in the creation of Blackdom, Frank Boyer, established the settlement in 1903 with 12 other Black homesteaders, according to the NPS. The community housed an estimated 150 people who began to disperse in the 1920s. Carlyn Pinkins – a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of New Mexico – plans to examine Black homesteads in New Mexico, including Blackdom, in her dissertation. 


First Impression Rodeo Club
Sports

The Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo

The rodeo – the quintessential showcase for cowboys and cowgirls. Anyone can be a cowboy, but the rodeo hasn’t always been considered an inclusive space for Black Americans. The search results for “famous cowboys” include names like Billy the Kid, Jesse James, or Buffalo Bill. The similarity between these individuals is that they’re all white. Bill Pickett, also known as the Dusky Demon, came along and changed that. Born in 1870, Pickett was an African American cowboy who introduced bulldogging, or steer wrestling, to the modern rodeo, according to Britannica. Today, most rodeos in the United States and across the world showcase this event. Pickett was one of the first Black cowboys to break into the traditionally white space of western rodeo.


OP-ED.jpeg
Opinion

Op-ed: 2024 Black History Month: Revitalizing the revolution By Imani Knox

In the month of February, we enter a time of reflection and re-embrace what the Black Community has done and continues to do – not only at the University of New Mexico, but in our ever-evolving world. Black History Month starts Feb. 1 and ends Feb. 29 and is a nationwide celebration that highlights those who have paved the way for Black Americans to be where they are today. As we enter this month at UNM, we emphasize the theme of “Revitalizing the Revolution” and bringing life to change in environments where growth is critical. What does “Revitalizing the Revolution” mean, exactly? To me and so many of the Black students here on campus, it means being able to have the courage and passion that so many of those who came before us demonstrated with every step they took that will allow us to open doors and improve the Black experience.



UNM student walk out for Gaza
News

Students stand in support of Palestine at Regents meeting

On the afternoon of Feb. 15, Protesters entered the Board of Regents meeting and stood silently along the walls, donning keffiyehs, Palestinian Flags and stickers that read “Freedom for Palestine” to stand united with those speaking in support of a divestment resolution. Just before dozens of protesters walked out of class and gathered at Zimmerman Plaza to listen to speakers discuss the ongoing crises in Gaza, they marched throughout the University of New Mexico ringing chants of “No Peace on Stolen Land” and “From the River to the Sea, Palestine will be free” across campus.


United.jpg
Sports

New Mexico United shatters the land of entrapment stereotype

The narrative of the Land of Entrapment is being challenged by New Mexico United’s team and fanbase, through the work the team does off the field. The documentary Underdog Uprising, which highlights United’s unique and committed fanbase, will be available for streaming on the Very Local app on Feb. 28. The documentary covers the work United and its supporters do to impact their community and how they challenge the underdog identity, according to Carlos Tenorio II, President of New Mexico United’s supporters’ group, The Curse. “We’re at the bottom of the good lists and the top of the bad lists… It doesn’t always have to be like that,” Tenorio said.


Kai Warrior Feature
Culture

Kai Warrior’s immersion into music

The goal was to create a fully immersive musical experience -  so Kai Warrior brought their childhood home to The Orpheum Community Hub on Saturday. Warrior is a local musician who grew up in Albuquerque. They released their debut EP, “Everything I Know,” on Feb. 3. Their work follows a cyclical motion and outlines the details of childhood, friendship, love and heartbreak, and then circles back to childhood. “I wanted the EP to feel fully engulfing, and I figured the only way to do that would be to recreate my life in a room,” Warrior said.


affirmative consent @ unm
Culture

Can I have some FRIES? Affirmative Consent at UNM

Affirmative consent at the University of New Mexico is not a new topic. Several resources around campus contribute to the conversation around consent.  Women’s Resource Center Director Áine McCarthy said that affirmative consent is freely given, reversible, informed, enthusiastic and specific, remembered by the acronym - FRIES. The University requires that consent is affirmative, according to UNM policy. Title IX Coordinator Angela Catena explained that coercion is not consent. “One of the myths is around, ‘well if I eventually get a yes that means I have consent,’” Catena said. “But that might not necessarily be the case.”


Diploma
News

New graduation requirements give high school students increased flexibility

Next year’s high school freshmen will see different graduation requirements due to a bill signed by Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham on Feb. 9. The new requirements seek to increase school attendance and graduation rates by giving students more choices in the classes they take, according to Lujan Grisham’s press release. “High school should be about preparing students for the real world while providing more opportunities to pursue their unique interests and future careers,” Lujan Grisham said in the press release.


Isotopes Brunch
Sports

Isotopes manager Pedro Lopez shares hopes for 2024 Season

Pedro Lopez is at the helm once again as the manager for the Albuquerque Isotopes 2024 season. Before he went off for Spring Training in Arizona, Lopez hosted a brunch where he expressed gratitude and explained what he wanted to achieve in the coming season. The event took place on Feb. 17 at the clubhouse in Isotopes stadium where the guests were served a diner-style breakfast array of foods, all of which were made by the head chef of Isotopes park. During the meeting, Lopez talked about the new and upcoming prospects that the Isotopes have on their hands going into this season, with high aspirations for Bradley Zimmer and infield players.


Women's Basketball vs San Jose
Sports

Women’s basketball: Lobos cruise to a win against San José State

The women's basketball team took care of business against the San José State Spartans as they blew them out 72-51 on Wednesday, Feb. 14. The Lobos remain in third place in the Mountain West conference with five games left of the regular season. Last time these two teams met up, the Lobos beat them on the road 65-54. With their latest win, the Lobos have now swept the Spartans – improving their record to 18-8 and 9-4 in conference play.


LoboRESPECT.jpeg
News

College affirmative consent bill heads to governor’s desk

The New Mexico Senate passed an amended bill Tuesday, Feb. 13 that would require state-funded colleges to include affirmative consent in their policies and procedures on sexual activity. House Bill 151, sponsored by Rep. Elizabeth Thomson (D) and four other House Democrats, defines affirmative consent as “affirmative, conscious and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity.” Affirmative consent cannot be given by a party who is unconscious or incapacitated, cannot be implied or assumed and can be revoked at any time, according to the bill. “With this, I’m hoping that particularly women – but everyone – realizes that their body belongs to them. They don’t owe anybody anything. Taking you out for dinner doesn’t mean you owe them sex. Being their girlfriend doesn’t mean you owe them sex,” Thomson said.


Chinese Culture Center
Culture

Lunar New Year: Albuquerque’s version

  Lunar New Year is a time of celebration throughout the world. Saturday, Feb. 10, the 50th annual Lunar New Year Celebration was held in Albuquerque’s International District at a martial arts school called the Chinese Culture Center. Ray Tokuda is the leader – or Sifu – of the Chinese Culture Center or Lin’s Martial Arts Academy and directed this year’s exhibition, which was filled with a variety of traditional practices.  Lunar New Year is a time of celebration and cleansing with the traditional practice of cleaning the home and ridding it of evil spirits with the help of traditional lion dancing, which is a key part of the yearly celebration.


Ask the Eds - relationship
Opinion

Ask the editors: How do you show love to your loved ones?

  With another Valentine's Day week coming to a close, we find chocolate wrappers tossed in trash cans and roses slowly drying under the sun. Six editors at the Daily Lobo came together to reflect on how we show love to those around us.  Time shared over a meal  As someone whose primary love language is quality time, I let the people in my life know that I love them by existing around them as much as I can. Having the ability to exist in the same space as another person without feeling anxious, performative or uncomfortable is precious. 


Men's B-ball vs. UNLV
Sports

Men's Basketball: Lobos miss out on taking their revenge on UNLV

The Lobo men’s basketball team hosted the University of Nevada, Las Vegas’ Runnin’ Rebels on Saturday, Feb. 10. They came into the match tied for the #1 team in the Mountain West Conference after defeating the Wyoming Cowboys. The Rebels were able to take down the Lobos for the second home loss of the season at 80-77. The Lobos had hoped to take their revenge on the Rebels after the Jan. 9 83-73 loss, but came up short.

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