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The Setonian
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Museum opts to postpone hearing on `Our Lady'

SANTA FE - Numerous State Troopers and Santa Fe Police stood shoulder-to-shoulder blocking the entrance to a community hearing on a bikini-clad depiction of Our Lady of Guadalupe at the Museum of International Folk Art Wednesday morning. The 10 a.m. hearing called by the Board of Regents of the Museum of New Mexico sought public input on the continuing exhibition of Alma L¢pez's "Our Lady" in the exhibit "Cyber Arte: Tradition Meets Technology." The hearing was supposed to be held in the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture next door to the folk art museum and the room quickly filled with more than 300 people. Santa Fe Police and State Troopers blocked another 200 people who sought entrance to the hearing, citing orders from the fire marshal.



The Setonian
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Bowens plans to resign from Senate at end of semester

The Senate passed appropriations and amendments with few arguments Wednesday night, though Sen. Da Vonda Bowens expressed disappointment with the group during her closing comments. At the end of the meeting, Bowens said she thought it was rude that senators were not paying attention to each other during the meeting. “People are talking and walking — what happened to order?” she asked.



The Setonian
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Slate abstains from debate

Members of The People slate answered questions about campus safety and group affiliations at Tuesday night’s election debate sponsored by the Pre-Law Association, while the Connection Slate opted not to participate. Following candidate questions, most of the forum focused on Senate Bill 5-B, which would eliminate the use of student fees to fund the Daily Lobo. Sen. Steve Aguilar, vice-presidential candidate for the Connection slate, said he and members of his slate did not participate because they did not agree with who the panelists were or the atmosphere of the debate. He said Tuesday night’s audience was not as diverse as it would have been had the ASUNM Election Commission organized the event.


The Setonian
News

Author: abortion first liberation

Abortion activist Laura Kaplan told a sparse gathering at the Kiva Lecture Hall Tuesday that legalizing abortion was one of the first steps to break the silent repression of women. Kaplan, who was a member of the Abortion Council Service of the Women’s Liberation in the late ’60s and early ’70s, said that, before various movements of ’60s, women were almost powerless about their lives, children and their bodies. She said the expected view of women was that they were less than men, childlike and to be seen and not heard. Kaplan said women never spoke to each other about any private matters, and if they did, it was always in whispers.



The Setonian
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UNM schools rank well on U.S. report

The UNM School of Medicine led the University in the latest rankings released by U.S. News and World Report, followed by the UNM Law School and UNM School of Engineering. The UNM School of Medicine is ranked second among U.S. medical schools for its rural medicine program in the latest rankings by U.S. News & World Report.


The Setonian
News

Author to tell history of abortion prior to 1973

Author Laura Kaplan will speak tonight on campus at 7 p.m. in the Kiva Lecture Hall about the controversial history of abortion prior to the Supreme Court’s decision to legalize it. Kaplan, who wrote “The Story of Jane: The Legendary Underground Feminist Abortion Service,” has worked as a midwife and an advocate for a nursing home residence and has also established a shelter in rural Wisconsin for domestic violence victims.


The Setonian
News

Debate spurs controversy

Sen. Steve Aguilar said he and other candidates on the Connection slate will not attend an election debate if they do not know and agree on the panelists who will ask questions. The debate is scheduled for tonight at 7 p.m. in room 123 of Dane Smith Hall. Aguilar, the vice-presidential candidate on the Connection slate, said he made a verbal agreement concerning the panel two weeks ago with Amanda Zubiate, vice-president of the Pre-Law Association, which is sponsoring the debate. He said they agreed that the panel would consist of one pre-law member, one College Republicans member and Margaret Toulouse from the College Democrats.



The Setonian
News

Legislation deadline looms

Gov. Gary Johnson has until Friday to act on several hundred bills passed by the Legislature during its final days, including UNM faculty and staff salary increases he vetoed last month. Johnson said in March that he would likely sign the salary bill.



The Setonian
News

KUNM launches its spring fund drive today

KUNM-89.9 FM volunteers reached their goal of raising $175,000 in October two hours ahead of schedule, and they’re hoping to repeat their success this week. Rob Raucci, the stations’ volunteer coordinator, is busy scheduling on-air and phone volunteers because today marks the beginning of KUNM’s five-day spring fund drive.


The Setonian
News

Ch†vez honored for his courage

UNM Chicano Studies Director Eduardo Hern†ndez Ch†vez beamed as students and community members passionately demonstrated what labor leader CÇsar Ch†vez meant to them Saturday at the National Hispanic Cultural Center. Hern†ndez Ch†vez helped organize the annual celebration held on Ch†vez’s birthday that recognizes his contributions to the Latino community. Ch†vez was the co-founder of the United Farm Workers’ Union.


The Setonian
News

Campus News In Brief

The ASUNM Candidates Forum for the spring election is today at 5 p.m. in room 101 of Mitchell Hall. Each candidate will give a brief speech, then will answer audience questions.


The Setonian
News

University fights decision against race-conscious admission policy

DETROIT — Lawyers for the University of Michigan and a group of minority students said this week they will immediately appeal a decision by U.S. District Court Judge Bernard Friedman that the university’s race-conscious law school admissions policy is unconstitutional. In a stinging 90-page decision released this week, Friedman rejected the university’s arguments that race was one of many factors used in admissions and said the law school’s admissions policy overemphasizes race to attain the functional equivalent of quotas of minority students.



The Setonian
News

Watchers focus on rape

A new group called Campus Watchers is trying to draw attention to sexual assault on campus and hopes to bring the UNM community together to fight the problem. The group is made up of members of the Agora Crisis Center, a student-run crisis hotline; Students Educating Peers About Sex; Triota, a Women’s Studies honor society; Rainndrops, a national anti-sexual assault group; and Albuquerque Rape Crisis Center. “This isn’t a response to any single incident, it’s more of a response to the complacency and lack of knowledge about sexual assault,” said Jeremy Jaramillo, president of Students Educating Peers About Sex. “You can read a lot into the word ‘watchers’ and understand what this group is about. We want people to become more aware and watch out for others on this campus.”


The Setonian
News

Holocaust survivor to speak on campus

Author Benjamin Jacobs will tell his story about how he survived the Holocaust to UNM students tonight. Jacobs, who wrote The Dentist of Auschwitz: A Memoir, will speak on campus at 7 p.m. in Woodward Hall, room 101. Shelli Rosenfeld, Student Special Events speakers’ director, said she the speech is part of a speakers series. Rosenfeld said she chose Jacobs as one of the speakers because she thought the Holocaust was something different to talk about. She added that many students don’t know about the personal effects of it because New Mexico does not have a very large Jewish population. “It’s not a big thing out here,” she said. “But now, with the opening of the Holocaust Museum, people are becoming more aware of it.” Rosenfeld said Jacobs will talk about how his profession saved his life during in the death camps. She said because he was a dentist, the Nazis assigned him to pull the gold teeth from bodies after they had been burned, in addition to dental testing and examining.

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